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Posts Tagged ‘Correll’

Happy Valley Ranch, which is a sister company of Jaffrey manufacturing has a cider mill called the American Harvester. It is a vintage style double tub cider presswith cast iron and stainless steel hardware. I really like the design of this press, as it is very much in line with the cider presses of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. I have not seen or used on personally, but would love to hear your comments if you have. The double tub cider mill is a great design in my mind because you can be doing two things at once. You can have one person grinding the apples through the “apple eater” as HVR calls it, and you can be pressing at the same time. Yes it is certainly a larger press than some of the others on the market, but I think it captures the apple pressing spirit. Correll Presses, made by hand in Elmira, Oregon are very similar in design. The Correll Press has a very large hopper for fruit and has a motorized grinder instead of the flywheel.

Please send your comments, pictures, ect. if you have a double tub cider press such as the American Harvester or a Correll Cider Press. I’d love to hear your stories and experiences with them.

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I have a recent acquaintance who just finished building a very nice cider press. I have some pictures I will post below. It is somewhat comparable to the Correll Press, although I like the differences between the two. He is both a woodworker and metalworker so building a cider press was right up his alley. A few highlights are: he buys old pressing tubs from yard sales or other places, then cuts them for the bands around the tubs. This way there aren’t any seems or overlapping on the cider press tubs, very nice idea. And using the aluminum and stainless steel, they won’t rust and should last many many years. He also makes all of his presses with electric grinders, so no fly wheel or manual crank to crush the apples. One of my favorite aspects of his press if the apple grinder. He makes it entirely of aluminum and/or stainless steel and as you can see from the picture below, it will cut through, crush, and “eat up” apples with ease. His grinder is my favorite piece of his apple press. If you are interested in one of his presses, just let me know. He makes 5-10 a year and sells them for around $700. Enjoy the pictures!

Handmade Cider Press

Handmade Cider Press

Handmade Apple Grinder

Handmade Apple Grinder

Cider Press Tub

Cider Press Tub

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We have recently added a new group using LinkedIn, a social networking tool. Using the forum we will be discussing how to make apple cider, sweet and hard cider recipes, restoring old cider presses and more. There are many new cider presses out on the market today, but most fail to capture the look and feel of the antique cider press. One man who does a great job is Robert Correll out of Elmira, Oregon. He has 5 or so different sizes of cider presses, all of which are the double tub style press. He even has motor enabled grinders, which may or may not appeal to the vintage cider presser. Most of the other new apple presses on the market today are either a single tub, with both grinder and press above pressing tub, such as the Jaffrey Cider Press which is also available as a kit.

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Now that you have successfully pressed the apple pomace through your fruit press and gathered the resulting juice, you are ready to enjoy your homemade apple cider. As mentioned in a previous post, you may want to run the juice through an additional filter, or you can leave it as it comes hot off the press. Without the additional filter you will probably have small pieces of pulp from the apples. Remember your fresh apple cider will  turn brown soon after contact with the air due to all of these small pieces of apple.

You should collect the juice from your cider press in a container that will be easy to transfer to smaller storing containers if you plan on freezing or giving away some of your special recipe. If you have a bucket that fits beneath your press, you can buy buckets with spigots, which make the transfer to smaller containers very easy. If not, you will probably need to invest in a filter (even and oil filter will work) to make the transfer. Unless you are planning to drink the cider in the very near future, you should always use plastic containers for longer term storage and freezing, and be sure to allow some “breathing” in the top of the container when freezing. If you are making a hard cider, you are getting to the good part. More to come on that in a later post.

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Once the apples are crushing into pumace they are ready to be pressed. Depending on what type of apple cider press you have will determine the ease of transitioning the pumace into the tubs for pressing. Some single tub presses, such as the Jaffrey 8400, havea grinder attachment that allows you to grind the apples directly into the tube, while all double tub presses, such as a Correll Press, allow you to grind the fruit into one tub while pressing in the second tub. Either way you will want to line the tub with a nylon cider press bag. The bag will act as a filter as you press the juice out of the fruit. Without the bag you will more than likely find stems, seed chunks and a great deal of pulp  in your apple cider. Once you have the pumace, or ground apples, into the lined tub it is time to press. Fold the nylon bag over so you seal off the top and then place the tub under your pressing block. You are now ready to begin pressing. Make sure you have a clean bucket or tub to collect the juice when pressing. It will depend on how high your press sits off the ground when figuring out the right collection method. You may want to consider a second filtration after the cider is pressed. You can use cheese cloth or a fine square of wire in conjunction with a funnel to do so.

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Step 2 – Crushing the Apples into Pumace

Once you have selected the apples and combination of your choice, it is time to grind the apples into a pumace  before pressing. This will create a mushy and very thick apple sauce type substance, and is a critical step to not only maximize the juice you will get when pressed, but will also prolong the life of your equipment. If you already own an apple cider press, you should have (or have the option) of an attached grinder. Certain presses, such as Correll Apple Presses have automatic grinders, while the more traditional cider presses have manual cranks or flywheels used to crush the apples. Jaffrey Manufacturing has a fruit grinder that can be purchased individually as well as the Weston Apple Grinder. If you don’t have a grinder with your apple or wine press, you can always use a kitchen blender, but it will take a lot longer to get the amount of pumace necessary for juicing. Once you have your pumace prepared it is now time to start pressing the fruit.

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