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Posts Tagged ‘pumace’

If you are pressing cider with an older press, or even a newer press for that matter, you may want to consider lining the tub with a cider press bag. This will insure that the juice or cider will be filtered when you begin to press. Some cider press tubs expand generously as they absord water, but that still leaves openings for larger pieces of seeds, stems and other undesirable pieces of pumace ending up in your cider.

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I am in the process of trying to rebuild the old apple grinder I am currently using. I have an antique press and the grinder is probably the most worn down piece of the entire cider press. I have to run the apples through a couple of times to get the pumace consistency I am looking to press. There is some good information online about how to rebuild a cider press, here is one of the best websites I know of:

http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/press/apple_grinder.html

If you are not into woodworking, or don’t feel you have the skills or tools to build one yourself, there are a number of manufacturers of new apple grinders. The, most popular are the Weston Fruit Grinder ,Happy Valley Ranch’s “Apple Eater”, and the Jaffrey Fruit Grinder.

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If you’ve ever visited a cider mill or fruit stand, chances are you have seen an antique apple cider press. Most of the old cider presses built in the early 1900’s or earlier were double tub or twin tub cider mills. This is a do it all cider press, but due to size and weight I think they have lost favor among casual cider makers. Most of the hardware used to make the old presses are cast iron, which is a long lasting material, but is also very heavy. Nowadays most of the cider presses that are manufactured are only single tub presses. Although these presses are a lot lighter and cheaper to manufacture, it can be more time consuming pressing your apples as you can only do one function at a time, either grinding your apples into a pumace (if an apple grinder is included) or pressing your fruit to extract the juices. If you’ve got to have it all, I would suggest trying to find an antique press that has the double tubs. The picture below is a great example of a double tub antique cider press.

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Step 2 – Crushing the Apples into Pumace

Once you have selected the apples and combination of your choice, it is time to grind the apples into a pumace  before pressing. This will create a mushy and very thick apple sauce type substance, and is a critical step to not only maximize the juice you will get when pressed, but will also prolong the life of your equipment. If you already own an apple cider press, you should have (or have the option) of an attached grinder. Certain presses, such as Correll Apple Presses have automatic grinders, while the more traditional cider presses have manual cranks or flywheels used to crush the apples. Jaffrey Manufacturing has a fruit grinder that can be purchased individually as well as the Weston Apple Grinder. If you don’t have a grinder with your apple or wine press, you can always use a kitchen blender, but it will take a lot longer to get the amount of pumace necessary for juicing. Once you have your pumace prepared it is now time to start pressing the fruit.

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